Tuesday, April 7, 2009

Joan Miró : Assemblage

Joan Miró is one of my all-time favorite artists.

Wait.

I say every artist is my all-time fave, don't I?

But this abstract artist from Spain really is. I love his carefree, child-like style, his colors. They just make you feel good looking at it.

I've long wanted to interpret Miró 's abstract style, and this project was alot of fun. I incorporated an assemblage technique, just to give the students something tactile to work with.

  • Make sure to bring some of Miró's artwork to show to the students, so they can get a better idea of Miró and his abstract style. This is such an important step in teaching modern art. Its hard to understand and/or visualize the concepts so being able to look at each artist's work is imperative.
  • Hand out 9 X 12 sheets of watercolor paper and make sure each student has a palette with 2-3 different watercolors.
  • It's important that the student use a large watercolor brush, to give the background an appearance of washed color, as Miró did.
  • Encourage them to blend their watercolors nicely because this is the first layer that we will be creating our assemblage on.
  • Once they are finished painting, bring out the trusty hairdryer so the projects can be done within the hour. No one likes to watch paint dry!
  • Once it is dry, encourage students to draw abstract shapes with oil pastels. They can also cut interesting shapes out of scrapbooking paper.
  • Once students have laid out their abstract design, they can add their final touch, which really brings a graphic punch to the project.
  • Black yarn! Of course, students could have used a black oil pastel or a black Sharpie, but I though using a spool of black yarn would be fun!
  • Each student created designs with a bottle of elmer's glue (just supervise them carefully or they will get glue happy and create a mess!), then carefully placed their black yarn on top of it, snipping off the end with a pair of scissors.
The artwork above was created was a third grader.

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Artistically speaking....